Note We are moving the content of this website to our new page currently located here, we will switch within the next days (written 29th of Aprli)



DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in some new interesting ways. Furthermore, it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking, and improving the encyclopedia itself.


Wiki Contents

This Wiki provides information about the DBpedia community project:

  • Datasets gives an overview about the DBpedia knowledge base.
  • Ontology gives an overview about the DBpedia ontology.
  • Online Access describes how the data set can be accessed via a SPARQL endpoint and as Linked Data.
  • Downloads provides the DBpedia data sets for download.
  • Interlinking describes how the DBpedia data set is interlinked with various other datasets on the Web.
  • Use Cases lists different use cases for the DBpedia data set.
  • Extraction Framework describes the DBpedia information extraction framework.
  • Data Provision Architecture paints a picture of the software and protocols used to serve DBpedia on the Web.
  • Community explains how the DBpedia community collaborates and how people can contribute to the DBpedia effort.
  • DBpedia Mapping Wiki containing the mappings used by the DBpedia extraction.
  • DBpedia Internationalization Effort working towards providing multiple language-specific versions of DBpedia.
  • DBpedia-Live presents the new DBpedia-Live framework.
  • DBpedia Spotlight presents the DBpedia Spotlight tool for the semantic annotation of textual content.
  • Credits lists the people and institutions that have contributed to DBpedia so far.
  • Change Log lists the DBpedia releases and gives an overview about the changes for earch release.
  • Next steps describes ideas and future plans for the DBpedia project.

The DBpedia Knowledge Base

Knowledge bases are playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the intelligence of Web and enterprise search and in supporting information integration. Today, most knowledge bases cover only specific domains, are created by relatively small groups of knowledge engineers, and are very cost intensive to keep up-to-date as domains change. At the same time, Wikipedia has grown into one of the central knowledge sources of mankind, maintained by thousands of contributors.


The DBpedia project leverages this gigantic source of knowledge by extracting structured information from Wikipedia and by making this information accessible on the Web under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License and the GNU Free Documentation License.



The English version of the DBpedia knowledge base describes 4.58 million things, out of which 4.22 million are classified in a consistent ontology, including 1,445,000 persons, 735,000 places (including 478,000 populated places), 411,000 creative works (including 123,000 music albums, 87,000 films and 19,000 video games), 241,000 organizations (including 58,000 companies and 49,000 educational institutions), 251,000 species and 6,000 diseases.


In addition, we provide localized versions of DBpedia in 125 languages. All these versions together describe 38.3 million things, out of which 23.8 million are localized descriptions of things that also exist in the English version of DBpedia. The full DBpedia data set features 38 million labels and abstracts in 125 different languages, 25.2 million links to images and 29.8 million links to external web pages; 80.9 million links to Wikipedia categories, and 41.2 million links to YAGO categories. DBpedia is connected with other Linked Datasets by around 50 million RDF links. Altogether the DBpedia 2014 release consists of 3 billion pieces of information (RDF triples) out of which 580 million were extracted from the English edition of Wikipedia, 2.46 billion were extracted from other language editions. Detailed statistics about the DBpedia datasets in 24 popular languages are provided at Dataset Statistics.


The DBpedia knowledge base has several advantages over existing knowledge bases: it covers many domains; it represents real community agreement; it automatically evolves as Wikipedia changes, and it is truly multilingual. The DBpedia knowledge base allows you to ask quite surprising queries against Wikipedia, for instance “Give me all cities in New Jersey with more than 10,000 inhabitants” or “Give me all Italian musicians from the 18th century”. Altogether, the use cases of the DBpedia knowledge base are widespread and range from enterprise knowledge management, over Web search to revolutionizing Wikipedia search.

Nucleus for the Web of Data

Within the W3C Linking Open Data (LOD) community effort, an increasing number of data providers have started to publish and interlink data on the Web according to Tim Berners-Lee’s Linked Data principles. The resulting Web of Data currently consists of several billion RDF triples and covers domains such as geographic information, people, companies, online communities, films, music, books and scientific publications. In addition to publishing and interlinking datasets, there is also ongoing work on Linked Data browsers, Linked Data crawlers, Web of Data search engines and other applications that consume Linked Data from the Web.


The DBpedia knowledge base is served as Linked Data on the Web. As DBpedia defines Linked Data URIs for millions of concepts, various data providers have started to set RDF links from their data sets to DBpedia, making DBpedia one of the central interlinking-hubs of the emerging Web of Data.


Feed Title: News (last 3 items)

DBpedia in Dutch: formalizing the chapter by signing the Memorandum of Understanding

The DBpedia community and members from over 20 countries work hard to localize and internationalize DBpedia and support the extraction of non-English Wikipedia editions as well as build a data community around a certain language, region or special interest. The chapters are part of the DBpedia executives and have taken on responsibility to contribute to the infrastructure of DBpedia.

Hereby we proudly announce that DBpedia in Dutch is the first chapter which signed the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). There are various intentions why they already signed the MoU: First of all they support the goals of the DBpedia Association, secondly they strengthen their own chapter and community of contributors and thirdly they improve the cooperation with the Dutch research infrastructure and the Dutch Digital Heritage. The cooperation was initiated by Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands) and Huygens ING (research institute of History and Culture).

director-of-kb-and-director-of-huygens-ing-signing-the-mou
Dr. E.J.B. Lily Knibbeler (director of KB) and Prof. Dr. Lex Heerma van Voss (director of Huygens ING) signing the MoU on 12th September 2016 in The Hague.

Other partners like imec/Ghent University and Institute of Sound and Vision have signed as well and became an executive partner of the DBpedia Association. The Vrije Universiteit will join soon. It is a cooperation between these Dutch organizations as well as the NL-DBpedia community.

The Dutch Chapter has provided a Sample DBpedia Chapter Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to use as a template for further chapters. If you use DBpedia and want us to keep going forward, we kindly invite you to donate and help DBpedia to grow. If you would like to become a member of the DBpedia Association, please go directly to the application form or contact us.

Check our website for further updates, stay tuned and follow us on Twitter.

Your DBpedia Association

DBpedia meetup in Poznan

After our successful meeting in Poznan in 2015, we thought it is time to meet the Polish DBpedia community again. The DBpedia meetup will be held on 22th of November 2016 at the Poznań University of Economics and Business. This meetup aims at the presentation of semantic web technologies and their use in applications by entrepreneurs.

*Quick facts*

The schedule for the DBpedia meetup in Poznan is included in the eventbrite page.

Get your ticket here and be part of this event.

Check our website for further updates, stay tuned and follow us on Twitter.

Your DBpedia Association

Retrospective: 2nd US DBpedia Community meeting in California

After the largest DBpedia meeting to date we decided it was time to cross the Atlantic for the second time for another meetup. Two weeks ago the 8th DBpedia Community Meeting was held in Sunnyvale, California on October 27th 2016.

Main Event

Pablo Mendes from Lattice Data Inc. opened the main event with a short introduction setting the tone for the evening. After that Dimitris Kontokostas gave technical and organizational DBpedia updates. The main event attracted attendees with lightning talks from major companies actively using DBpedia or interested in knowledge graphs in general.

Four major institutions described their efforts to organize reusable information in a centralized knowledge representation. Google’s Tatiana Libman presented (on behalf of Denny Vrandečić) the impressive scale of the Google Knowledge graph, with 1B+ entities and over 100 billion facts.

Tatiana Libman from Google
Tatiana Libman from Google

Yahoo’s Nicolas Torzec presented the Yahoo knowledge graph, with focus on their research on extracting data from Web tables to expand their knowledge which includes DBpedia as an important part. Qi He from LinkedIn focused mostly on how to model a knowledge graph of people and skills, which becomes particularly interesting with the possibility of integration with Microsoft’s Satori Graph. Such an integration would allow general domain knowledge and very specific knowledge about professionals complementing one another. Stas Malyshev from Wikidata presented statistics on their growth, points of contact with DBpedia as well as an impressive SPARQL query interface that can be used to query the structured data that they are generating.

Three other speakers focused on the impact of DBpedia in machine learning and natural language processing. Daniel Gruhl from IBM Watson gave the talk “Truth for the impatient” where he showed that a knowledge model built from DBpedia can help costs and time to value for extracting entity mentions with higher accuracy. Pablo Mendes from Lattice Data Inc. presented their approach that leverages DBpedia and other structured information sources for weak supervision to obtain very strong NLP extractors. Sujan Perera from IBM Watson discussed the problem of identifying implicit mentions of entities in tweets and how the knowledge represented in DBpedia can be used to help uncover those references.

Another three speakers focused on applications of DBpedia and knowledge graphs. Margaret Warren from Metadata Authoring Systems, LLC presented ImageSnippets and how background knowledge from DBpedia allows better multimedia search through inference. For instance, by searching for “birds” you may find pictures that haven’t been explicitly tagged as birds but for which the fact can be inferred from DBpedia. Jans Aasman from Franz Inc presented their company’s approach to Data Exploration with Visual SPARQL Queries. They described opportunities for graph analytics in the medical domain, and discussed how DBpedia has been useful in their applications. Finally, Wang-Chiew Tan presented their research at RIT relating to building chatbots, among other projects that relate to using background knowledge stored in computers to enrich real life experiences.

8th-dbpedia-meeting_california
Nicolas Torzec from Yahoo

Overall the talks were very high quality and fostered plenty of discussions afterwards. We finalized the event with a round of introductions where every attendee got to say their name and affiliation to help them connect with one another throughout the final hour of the event.

All slides and presentations are also available on our Website and you will find more feedback and photos about the event on Twitter via #DBpediaCA.

We would like to thank Yahoo for hosting the event, Google Summer of Code 2016 mentor summit as the reason we were in the area and collocated the DBpedia meeting, the Institute for Applied Informatics for supporting the DBpedia Association, ALIGNED – Software and Data Engineering for funding the development of DBpedia as a project use-case and last but not least OpenLink Software for continuous hosting the main DBpedia Endpoint.

Many thanks to Pablo Mendes for writing this blogpost :)

So now, we are looking forward to the next DBpedia community meeting which will be held in Europe again. We will keep you informed via the DBpedia Website and Blog.

Your DBpedia Association


This material is Open Knowledge


       


For a recent overview paper about DBpedia, please refer to: