Note We are moving the content of this website to our new page currently located here, we will switch within the next days (written 29th of Aprli)



DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in some new interesting ways. Furthermore, it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking, and improving the encyclopedia itself.


Wiki Contents

This Wiki provides information about the DBpedia community project:

  • Datasets gives an overview about the DBpedia knowledge base.
  • Ontology gives an overview about the DBpedia ontology.
  • Online Access describes how the data set can be accessed via a SPARQL endpoint and as Linked Data.
  • Downloads provides the DBpedia data sets for download.
  • Interlinking describes how the DBpedia data set is interlinked with various other datasets on the Web.
  • Use Cases lists different use cases for the DBpedia data set.
  • Extraction Framework describes the DBpedia information extraction framework.
  • Data Provision Architecture paints a picture of the software and protocols used to serve DBpedia on the Web.
  • Community explains how the DBpedia community collaborates and how people can contribute to the DBpedia effort.
  • DBpedia Mapping Wiki containing the mappings used by the DBpedia extraction.
  • DBpedia Internationalization Effort working towards providing multiple language-specific versions of DBpedia.
  • DBpedia-Live presents the new DBpedia-Live framework.
  • DBpedia Spotlight presents the DBpedia Spotlight tool for the semantic annotation of textual content.
  • Credits lists the people and institutions that have contributed to DBpedia so far.
  • Change Log lists the DBpedia releases and gives an overview about the changes for earch release.
  • Next steps describes ideas and future plans for the DBpedia project.

The DBpedia Knowledge Base

Knowledge bases are playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the intelligence of Web and enterprise search and in supporting information integration. Today, most knowledge bases cover only specific domains, are created by relatively small groups of knowledge engineers, and are very cost intensive to keep up-to-date as domains change. At the same time, Wikipedia has grown into one of the central knowledge sources of mankind, maintained by thousands of contributors.


The DBpedia project leverages this gigantic source of knowledge by extracting structured information from Wikipedia and by making this information accessible on the Web under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License and the GNU Free Documentation License.



The English version of the DBpedia knowledge base describes 4.58 million things, out of which 4.22 million are classified in a consistent ontology, including 1,445,000 persons, 735,000 places (including 478,000 populated places), 411,000 creative works (including 123,000 music albums, 87,000 films and 19,000 video games), 241,000 organizations (including 58,000 companies and 49,000 educational institutions), 251,000 species and 6,000 diseases.


In addition, we provide localized versions of DBpedia in 125 languages. All these versions together describe 38.3 million things, out of which 23.8 million are localized descriptions of things that also exist in the English version of DBpedia. The full DBpedia data set features 38 million labels and abstracts in 125 different languages, 25.2 million links to images and 29.8 million links to external web pages; 80.9 million links to Wikipedia categories, and 41.2 million links to YAGO categories. DBpedia is connected with other Linked Datasets by around 50 million RDF links. Altogether the DBpedia 2014 release consists of 3 billion pieces of information (RDF triples) out of which 580 million were extracted from the English edition of Wikipedia, 2.46 billion were extracted from other language editions. Detailed statistics about the DBpedia datasets in 24 popular languages are provided at Dataset Statistics.


The DBpedia knowledge base has several advantages over existing knowledge bases: it covers many domains; it represents real community agreement; it automatically evolves as Wikipedia changes, and it is truly multilingual. The DBpedia knowledge base allows you to ask quite surprising queries against Wikipedia, for instance “Give me all cities in New Jersey with more than 10,000 inhabitants” or “Give me all Italian musicians from the 18th century”. Altogether, the use cases of the DBpedia knowledge base are widespread and range from enterprise knowledge management, over Web search to revolutionizing Wikipedia search.

Nucleus for the Web of Data

Within the W3C Linking Open Data (LOD) community effort, an increasing number of data providers have started to publish and interlink data on the Web according to Tim Berners-Lee’s Linked Data principles. The resulting Web of Data currently consists of several billion RDF triples and covers domains such as geographic information, people, companies, online communities, films, music, books and scientific publications. In addition to publishing and interlinking datasets, there is also ongoing work on Linked Data browsers, Linked Data crawlers, Web of Data search engines and other applications that consume Linked Data from the Web.


The DBpedia knowledge base is served as Linked Data on the Web. As DBpedia defines Linked Data URIs for millions of concepts, various data providers have started to set RDF links from their data sets to DBpedia, making DBpedia one of the central interlinking-hubs of the emerging Web of Data.


Feed Title: News (last 3 items)

Call For Participation: 7th DBpedia Community Meeting in Leipzig

Following our successful meetings in Europe & US our next DBpedia meeting will be held at Leipzig on September 15th, co-located with SEMANTiCS.

* Highlights *

– Keynote by Lydia Pintscher, Wikidata

– A session for the “DBpedia references and citations challenge

– A session on DBpedia ontology by members of the DBpedia ontology committee

– Tell us what cool things you do with DBpedia: https://goo.gl/AieceU

– As always, there will be tutorials to learn about DBpedia

 

* Quick facts *

– Web URL: http://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/Leipzig2016

– Hashtag: #DBpediaLeipzig

– When: September 15th, 2016

– Where: University of Leipzig, Augustusplatz 10, 04109 Leipzig

– Call for Contribution: submission form

– Registration: Free to participate but only through registration (Option for DBpedia support tickets)

 

* Sponsors and Acknowledgments *

University of Leipzig

National Library of the Netherlands

ALIGNED Project

Institute for Applied Informatics (InfAI)

OpenLink Software

SEMANTICS Conference (Sep 12-15, 2016 in Leipzig)

 

If you would like to become a sponsor for the 7th DBpedia Meeting, please contact the DBpedia Association (dbpedia@infai.org).

 

* Organisation *

Magnus Knuth, HPI, DBpedia German/Commons

Monika Solanki, University of Oxford, DBpedia Ontology

Julia Holze, DBpedia Association

Dimitris Kontokostas, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

Stay tuned and follow us on facebook, twitter or visit our website for the latest news.

Your DBpedia Association

DBpedia citations & references challenge

In the latest release (2015-10) DBpedia started exploring the citation and reference data from Wikipedia and we were pleasantly surprised by the rich data we managed to extract.

This data holds huge potential, especially for the Wikidata challenge of providing a reference source for every statement. It describes not only a lot of bibliographical data, but also a lot of web pages and many other sources around the web.

The data we extract at the moment is quite raw and can be improved in many different ways. Some of the potential improvements are:

We welcome contributions that improve the existing citation dataset in any way; and we are open to collaboration and helping. Results will be presented at the next DBpedia meeting: 15 September 2016 in Leipzig, co-located with SEMANTiCS 2016. Each participant should submit a short description of his/her contribution by Monday 12 September 2016 and present his/her work at the meeting. Comments, questions can be posted on the DBpedia discussion & developer lists or in our new DBpedia ideas page.

Submissions will be judged by the Organizing Committee and the best two will receive a prize.

Organizing Committee

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Your DBpedia Association

DBpedia @ BIS 2016

DBpedia will be part of the 19th International Conference on Business Information Systems (6-8 July 2016) at the University of Leipzig. The conference addresses a wide scientific community and experts involved in the development of business computing applications.The three-day conference program is a mix of workshops, tutorials and paper sessions. Following, you will find more information about the DBpedia tutorial:

When?

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

What?

DBpedia Tutorial on Semantic Knowledge Integration in established Data (IT) Environments

Enriching data with a semantic layer and linking entities is key to what is loosely called Smart Data. An easy, yet comprehensive way of achieving this is the use of Linked Data standards.

In this DBpedia tutorial, we will introduce

  • the basic ideas of Linked Data and other Semantic Web standards
  • existing open datasets that can be freely reused (including DBpedia of course)
  • software and services in the DBpedia infrastructure such as the DBpedia SPARQL service, the lookup service and the DBpedia Spotlight Entity Linking service
  • common business use cases that will help to apply the learned lessons into practice
  • integration example into a hypothetical environment

In particular, we would like  to show how to seamlessly integrate Linked Data technologies into existing IT- and data-environments and discuss how to link private corporate data knowledge graphs to DBpedia and Linked Open Data. Another special focus is on finding links in text and unstructured data.

Interesting links:

Duration

2 x 90 minutes (half day)

Target audience

  • Practitioners that would like to learn about linked data and take home the know-how to apply it in their organisation
  • Researchers and students that would like to use linked data in their research

Who?

The tutorial is held by core members of the DBpedia Association and members of the AKSW/KILT research group in the context of three large research projects:

Markus Freudenberg (main contact: freudenberg@informatik.uni-leipzig.de), Markus Ackermann, Kay Müller, Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, Leipzig University

Stay tuned and follow us on facebook, twitter or visit our website for the latest news.

Your DBpedia Association


This material is Open Knowledge


       


For a recent overview paper about DBpedia, please refer to: